Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt

A thorough knowledge of the Bible is worth more than a college education.

Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.

The great virtue of my radicalism lies in the fact that I am perfectly ready, if necessary, to be radical on the conservative side.

The best executive is one who has sense enough to pick good people to do what he wants done, and self-restraint enough to keep from meddling with them while they do it.

Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat.

Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.

Do what you can with what you have, where you are.

While my interest in natural history has added very little to my sum of achievement, it has added immeasurably to my sum of enjoyment in life.

It behooves every man to remember that the work of the critic, is of altogether secondary importance, and that, in the end, progress is accomplished by the man who does things.

Keep your eyes on the stars, and your feet on the ground.

If I must choose between righteousness and peace, I choose righteousness.

A vote is like a rifle: its usefulness depends upon the character of the user.

To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public.

A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad.

Do what you can with what you have where you are.

The only man who never makes a mistake is the man who never does anything.

When they call the roll in the Senate, the Senators do not know whether to answer \Present\" or \"Not Guilty.\""

The country needs and, unless I mistake its temper, the country demands bold, persistent, experimentation. It is common sense to take a method and try it, if it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something.

Nine-tenths of wisdom consists in being wise in time.

Justice consists not in being neutral between right and wrong, but in finding out the right and upholding it, wherever found, against the wrong.

Practical efficiency is common, and lofty idealism not uncommon; it is the combination which is necessary, and the combination is rare

Put out the light.

Spend and be spent.

Far better is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the grey twilight that knows not victory nor defeat.

Of all forms of tyranny the least attractive and the most vulgar is the tyranny of mere wealth, the tyranny of plutocracy.