C. C. Colton

C. C. Colton

He that will believe only what he can fully comprehend must have a long head or a very short creed.

It is with disease of the mind, as with those of the body; we are half dead before we understand our disorder, and half cured when we do.

True friendship is like sound health, the value of it is seldom known until it is lost.

The reason why great men meet with so little pity or attachment in adversity, would seem to be this: the friends of a great man were made by his fortune, his enemies by himself, and revenge is a much more punctual paymaster than gratitude.

There is this difference between happiness and wisdom, that he that thinks himself the happiest man, really is so; but he who thinks himself the wisest, is generally the greatest fool.

Falsehood is never so successful as when she baits her hook with truth, and no opinions so fatally mislead us, as those that are not wholly wrong; as no watches so effectually deceive the wearer as those that are sometimes right.

Love is an alliance of friendship and animalism; if the former predominates it is passion exalted and refined; if the latter, gross and sensual.

To know the pains of power, we must go to those who have it; to know its pleasures, we must go to those who are seeking it. The pains of power are real; its pleasures imaginary.

There is this paradox in pride - it makes some men ridiculous, but prevents others from becoming so.

We ought not be over anxious to encourage innovation, in case of doubtful improvement, for an old system must ever have two advantages over a new one; it is established and it is understood.

Two things, well considered, would prevent many quarrels; first to have it well ascertained whether we are not disputing about terms rather than things; and secondly, to examine whether that on which we differ in worth contending about.

The slightest sorrow for sin is sufficient if it produce amendment, and the greatest insufficient if it do not.

It is only when the rich are sick that they fully feel the impotence of wealth.

He that thinks himself the wisest is generally the least so.

No company is preferable to bad, because we are more apt to catch the vices of others than their virtues, as disease is far more contagious than health.

To know a man, observe how he wins his object, rather than how he loses it; for when we fail, our pride supports; when we succeed; it betrays us.